Places where the air pressure is high, are called high pressure systems. The answer has to do with the typical air flow around high and low pressure.

Another explanation that is widely accepted is the movement of planet Earth underneath the moving air. Experts note that when air moves the direction it takes is from high to low pressure, going in a spiral pattern.
With A moving to the west and B moving to the east the line from A to B is rotating counterclockwise. High pressure often brings fine weather, but low pressure draws moisture from the ground creating clouds, rain and storms. Air pressure is not uniform across the planet, however.

When you suck on a straw, how does the drink know to go up the straw? you are not sucking the liquid so much as creating an low pressure area in your mouth.

And air pressure is a force created by the weight of the air from any given level to the top of the atmosphere. Air flows from high pressure to lower pressure. Gases move from high-pressure areas to low-pressure areas. A parcel of air at B would move toward the center of the low pressure area which would also take it closer to the center of the spinning disk where its speed is greater than the surrounding points.

If not provided with any external agency then yes! But why does the air move at all?

Air pressure is not uniform across the planet, however. But if you provide some external agency like compressors, then air can flow from low pressure to high pressure.

If not provided with any external agency then yes!
The tendency for air to move from an area of high pressure to an area of low pressure is called the pressure gradient force (PGF). If you had 2 regions, one with high pressure and one with low pressure, connected by a pipe, particles would move both ways.   These differences are the result of low and high air pressure systems, which are caused by unequal heating across the Earth's surface and the pressure gradient force. Well, high pressure is associated with sinking air, and low pressure is associated with rising air. Experts note that when air moves the direction it takes is from high to low pressure, going in a spiral pattern. AC Low Side High, High Side Low: Why Does This Happen?

Air flows from high pressure to lower pressure.

The answer to this question is quite intuitive when you think about what pressure is: a force per unit area.

High pressure weather systems typically result from colder air patterns while low pressure weather systems generally result from warmer air patterns. The normal range of the Earth's air pressure is from 970 MB to 1,050 MB. But air doesn’t move in a straight line. Another explanation that is widely accepted is the movement of planet Earth underneath the moving air. Winds blow towards the low pressure, and the air rises in the atmosphere where they meet.

Air pressure does not like to move, it is the air that moves from areas of high pressure to areas of low pressure. The high force "overpowers" the lower force, pushing the particles from the high pressure zone to the lower pressure zone. A low pressure system has lower pressure at its center than the areas around it. The pressure reading from the low side should be between 25 and 30 psi and the high side between 200 and 250 psi. If that force is greater at point A than at point B, the parcel of air will move directly from point A to point B, or as you have noted from high pressure to low pressure.

If that force is greater at point A than at point B, the parcel of air will move directly from point A to point B, or as you have noted from high pressure to low pressure.   These differences are the result of low and high air pressure systems, which are caused by unequal heating across the Earth's surface and the pressure gradient force. But if you see the AC low side high, high side low , such as the low side is 100 and the high side is 150, there might be problems with any of the inner components. That rush of air is the wind we experience. Coriolis Effect and Wind Direction If the Earth didn't spin, the convection currents in the atmosphere could develop winds that would blow from the poles all the way to the equator. But air doesn’t move in a straight line. As the air rises, the water vapor within it condenses, forming clouds and often precipitation. And air pressure is a force created by the weight of the air from any given level to the top of the atmosphere.